Summer Graduate Course:

Growing Agriculture in Your Classroom

Beginning workshop: Thursday, July 9, 2015
Ending workshop: Thursday, August 6, 2015
Time: 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
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About

Our popular 3 Credit Summer Graduate Course for educators returns for an eight year in the summer of 2014. Massachusetts Agriculture in the Classroom, collaborating with Fitchburg State College, will offer this three-credit graduate course, titled "Growing Agriculture in the Classroom," using Massachusetts farms as classrooms. Teachers will participate in agricultural-literacy training through fun, hands-on study and investigation of agriculture education resources. It will help enhance curriculum and assist with connections to the curriculum standard.

The course will meet on Thursday, July 9th and Thursday August 6th at the Brigham Hill Community Farm in North Grafton from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Each participant must attend both sessions and also participate in six additional workshops during the summer on farms across the state.

Participants will keep a journal of their agricultural journey and developing a classroom project, which they will present to their peers on August 66. Farm workshops may cover topics such as nutrition; plant science; soils; water; economics; technology; ag-history; farm animals; energy, sustainable agriculture and more.

This course will assist new educators and those who want to expand their offerings to integrate agriculture into the classroom. Participants will learn how to create community partnerships; link the classroom to the farm; expand math, science, social studies, art, nutrition and other educational knowledge using agricultural examples, and explore technology and engineering techniques.

The fee for this eight-day course is $500 and includes all materials; farm workshops; some meals and three graduate credits or 67 professional development points from Fitchburg State College. Participants will be paired with a MAC board member to give long-term access to agricultural resources and support.

Thursday, July 9: Opening Workshop
9-3 5 class hours Mandatory for all participants
Brigham Hill Community Farm, North Grafton, Massachusetts
Introduction to agriculture course, hands on demonstrations, course logistics,
5-Star model lesson plan. Distribution of course manuals.

Schedule of Summer Workshops

Thursday July 9 Opening Workshop
 

Mandatory for all Summer Graduate Course participants
Brigham Hill Community Farm, North Grafton, Massachusetts
Introduction to agriculture course, hands on demonstrations, course logistics,
5-Star model lesson plan. Distribution of course manuals. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Wednesday, July 15:

Pollinators and How to Attract Them Workshop at UMass Amherst in the Pollinator Garden
 

Pollinators are everywhere and they play and extremely important role in our lives and habitats, from pollinating the foods that we eat to initiating the development of the seeds that ensure survival of native plants. On Wednesday July 15, travel to UMass Amherst where the new Pollinator Garden was funded thanks to a generous contribution from the Massachusetts State Grange. We will utilize the new garden to review pollinator needs during their various life stages. Learn what is happening to our pollinators? Who are the pollinators in our gardens? How school gardens can be designed to attract a variety of pollinators? Do we know why honeybee populations are diminishing? These are some of the questions that will be answered at this educational farm site by instructors Ken Oles and Dr. Stephen Herbert. You will also see a selection of plants with flowering characteristics that will benefit pollinators and also complement the school calendar. You will also have the chance to review MAC’s Pollinator lessons.

 

Workshop Activities:

Science: Learn about Pollination and Bee social behavior
Science: Recognizing native pollinators in native habitats
Science: Recognizing habitats and plants that encourage pollinators

Standards/Frameworks:

Life Science/Biology gr 3-5: Standard 8
Describe how organisms meet some of their needs in and environment by using behaviors in response to stimuli received from the environment.

Life Science/Biology gr 3-5: Standard 2
Identify structures in plants (leaves, roots, flowers, stem, bark, wood) that are
responsible for food production, support, water transport, reproduction, growth and protection.

Life Science/Biology gr 3-5: Standard 3
Recognize plants and animals go through predictable life cycles that include birth, growth, development, reproduction and death

Technology/Engineering Grades 6-8: 2 Engineering Design, 2.1
Identify and explain the steps of the engineering design process, e.e., identify the need or problem, research the problem, develop possible solutions, select the best possible solution, construct a prototype, test and evaluate, communicate the solution and redesign

Technology/Engineering Grades 6-8: 2 Engineering Design, 2.2
Demonstrate methods of representing solutions to a design problem, e.g. sketches, orthographic projections, multiview drawings.

 

Thursday, July 16 Math with a Forest or A Tree Workshop at Curtis Farm in Westminster
 

Travel to Curtis Farm in Westminster on Thursday, July 16, where we’ll spend the day learning about forests and tree with owners JoAnn and Chris Mossman. How can children in your class relate to the trees in their own backyard, the school yard or forested farm property? How can you estimate the age of a tree? Are there ways to determine the height of a tree or how wide its branches are? You will leave this workshop with skills to do this that can be shared with your class. Gini Traub, of Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation and Project Learning Tree will demonstrate and share environmental lessons with the class. These lessons in forestry and the environment can be used if your school borders a forest or if you only have a few trees in the schoolyard. You will learn the reasons a farm should have a forestry plan to manage the trees on their property and leave with a better sense of how farms maintain their forests to better the environment for us all.

 

Workshop Activities:

Math: Classroom activities to determine diameter/height of trees, calculating drip circle, estimating gallons of sap needed for syrup, calculating amount of firewood needed for boiling syrup.
Science: observation and record keeping, graphs & diagrams, evaporation.
Science: demonstration of use of simple machines in forestry
Ecology: preserving the best of forest lands to assure healthy future growth.

Standards/Frameworks:

Life Science/Biology gr 3-5: Standard 2
Identify structures in plants (leaves, roots, flowers, stem, bark, wood) that are responsible for food production, support, water transport, reproduction, growth and protection.

Health – Personal and Community Health Strand, ecological Health Standard 13
Students will gain knowledge of the interdependence between the environment and physical health, and will acquire skills to care for the environment.

Tech/Engineering gr 3-5: 1.3
Identify and explain the difference between simple and complex machines (e.g. hand can opener that includes multiple gears, wheel, wedge, and lever).

Math 2.MD Measure and estimate lengths in standard units
1. Measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools such as rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tapes.
2. Measure the length of an object twice ,using length units of different lengths for the two measurements: describe how the two measurements relate to the size of the unit chosen.
3. Estimate lengths using units of inches, feet, centimeters ,and meters.
4. Measure to determine how much longer one object is than another, expressing the length difference in terms of a standard length unit.

Math 6.G; Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, surface area and volume.
1. Find the area of right triangles, other triangles, special quadrilaterals, and polygons by composing into rectangles or decomposing into triangles and other shapes: Apply these techniques in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems.
MA 1.a. Use the relationships among radius, diameter and center of a circle to find its circumference and area.
MA.1.b. Solve real-world problems and math

Math 7.G
4. Know the formulas for he area and circumference of a circle and solve problems, give an informational derivation of the relationship between the circumference and area of a circle.

Wednesday, July 22 Beyond Lettuce: More Vegetables for the School Garden at Cook's Valley Farm in Wrentham
 

Wednesday, July 22 takes us to Cook’s Valley Farm in Wrentham, where owners Warren and Marilyn Cook will tell us about the farm’s history, transition from dairy and chicken farm to a farmstand with 30 acres of vegetable, small fruits and fruit trees. They will also explore vegetables for the school garden. Now that your students have conquered lettuce and the Three Sisters Garden, what other vegetables can they grow? Learn what can be planted that will survive the summer and be ready to harvest in the fall? Explore planting methods from other countries and learn some ways to amend the soil in your school garden. Then brainstorm ways to extend the growing season with your students.

 

Workshop Activities:

Nutrition: plant school gardens, experience new foods as snacks.
Brainstorm ways to use garden produce in cafeterias.
Economics: What is “value added”?
Economics: making changes in marketing to stay profitable.
Math: Daily income needed to stabilize the farm.

Standards/Frameworks:

Health: Nutrition Strand, Standard 3.5
Students will gain the knowledge and skills to select a diet that supports health and reduces the risk of illness and future chronic diseases.

Standard 3.11:
Analyze dietary intake and eating patterns

Life Science/Biology gr 3-5: Standard 3
Recognize plants and animals go through predictable life cycles that include birth, growth, development, reproduction and death.

Geography/History gr. 3: Standard 3.13
Give examples of goods and services provided by their local businesses and industries.

Earth/Space Science gr 3-5 Standard 5
Give examples of goods and services provided by their local businesses and industries.

Thursday, July 23 Agriculture Everyday in the Curriculum! at Hawlemont School in Charlemont
 

The Hawlemont School instituted a school-wide agriculture program in 2013 called Hawlemont, Agriculture, & You, when this public school determined that they wanted agriculture to be part of every aspect of their curriculum. On Thursday July 23, well visit this unique school in Charlemont to learn how teachers, administration and the community came together to bring agriculture to life school wide. Teacher Jeanne Bruffee and Principal Wayne Kermenski will explain the steps they took to make that vision happen and the ways in which they partnered with parents to accept and champion the plan. We will We will tour the school, gardens and greenhouse and meet the animals that live at the school. Ken Oles will present a lesson on soils, including lessons that can be shared with your class..

 

Workshop Activities:

Science: Testing and amending soil with minerals for soil health.
Horticulture practices to optimize health of plants


Standards/Frameworks:

Earth/Space Science gr 3-5 Standard 4:
Explain and give examples of ways in which soil is formed (weathering of rock by water and wind, from decomposition of plant and animal remains).

Earth/Space Science gr 3-5 Standard 5:
Recognize and discuss different properties of soil, including color, texture, the ability to retain water and the ability to support the growth of plants.

Life Science/Biology gr 3-5: Standard 2:
Identify structures in plants (leaves, roots, flowers, stem, bark, wood) that are responsible for food production, support, water transport, reproduction, growth and protection.

Life Science/Biology gr 3-5: Standard 3:
Recognize plants and animals go through predictable life cycles that include birth, growth, development, reproduction and death.

Wednesday, July 29 Got Milk! Exploring a Family Dairy Farm at Cooper's Hilltop Dairy Farm in Rochdale
 

On Wednesday, July 29, travel Cooper’s Hilltop Dairy Farm in Rochdale to learn how this farm has spanned generations of family ownership and continues to be a working farm - a small dairy farm that processes and sells all their milk on-site. Meet the cows and the family and hear how the farm is expanding to meet the needs of the community and to include a new generation in the farm venture. You will learn how they have made adaptations in order to move their business into the future as a new generation takes on the management of the farm. Try some math activities that show how a farmer can determine his profit; how to calculate the yield of crops; and how to determine the milk yield of each cow. Marjorie Cooper will share easily adapted lessons on making butter and ice cream with your class.

 

Workshops Activities:

Science: Changing liquids into solids
Care and humane treatment of animals
Technology: newest innovations in milking machinery
Philosophy/Ethics: Raising livestock for dairy products and meat

Standards/Frameworks:

Health- Nutrition Strand: Standard 3.5:
Students will gain the knowledge and skills to select a diet that supports health and reduces the risk of illness and future chronic diseases.

Social Studies: North American Geography, Grade 4: Concepts and Skills, Economics 8:
Give examples of how interaction of buyers and sellers influences the prices of goods and services in markets.

Social Studies: US History, Geography, Economics & Government, Gr 5:Concepts and Skills, Economics 13:
Define profit and describe how profit is an incentive for entrepreneurs.

Geography/History gr. 3: Standard 3.13:
Give examples of goods and services provided by their local businesses and industries.

Tech/Engineering gr 3-5: 1.3:
Identify and explain the difference between simple and complex machines (e.g. hand can opener that includes multiple gears, wheel, wedge, and lever).

Geography/History gr 3: Standard 3.12:
Explain how objects or artifacts of everyday life in the past tell us how ordinary people lived and how everyday life has changed.

Life Science/Biology gr 3-5: Standard 3:
Recognize plants and animals go through predictable life cycles that include birth, growth, development, reproduction and death.

Math Ratios and Proportional Relationships 6.RP

Understand ratio concepts and use ratio reasoning to solve problems.
1.Understand the concept of a ratio and use ratio language to describe a ratio relationship between two quantities.

Thursday, July 24 Preserving the Harvest Workshop at Alderbrook Farm in South Dartmouth and the North Dartmouth Grange # 162
 

Once you have raised a successful garden, what are your plans for all those extra vegetables? Come to Alderbrook Farm in South Dartmouth on Thursday, July 30, to meet farmers Nancy and Allen Manley , who will give us a tour of their gardens and adopted farm animals while sharing ways to store vegetables for use later in the season. Later, we will review methods of storing and preserving vegetables and have hands on lessons concentrating on pickling and fermentation. As we cook in the commercial kitchen of North Dartmouth Grange #162, a member of the Grange will explain about their unique plan that involves community use of the site. You will receive recipes to take home, some simple enough to do in your own classroom, and leave this workshop with a jar of your own product.

 

Workshop Activities:

Science: observing plants and animals in the natural environment
Developing cooking skills to preserve the harvest
Math: Following directions and measurements in a recipe to obtain desired results

Standards/Frameworks:

Life Science/Biology gr 3-5: Standard 2:
Identify structures in plants (leaves, roots, flowers, stem, bark, wood) that are responsible for food production, support, water transport, reproduction, growth and protection.

Life Science/Biology gr 3-5: Standard 3:
Recognize plants and animals go through predictable life cycles that include birth, growth, development, reproduction and death.

Health: Nutrition Strand, Standard 3.5
Students will gain the knowledge and skills to select a diet that supports health and reduces the risk of illness and future chronic diseases.

Tuesday, August 4

MAC Summer Conference Connecting the Classroom to the School Garden at Tahanto Regional High School in Northborough. Read more about our summer conference

You may use this day as a makeup if you have missed one of the six Farm Workshops or you may include this day in addition to the workshops. Four sessions with concurrently running classes each related to the school garden. Topics and correlations with the Frameworks will be available in June.

Thursday August 6

Closing Presentation Workshop 9-3 5 class hours
Mandatory
Brigham Hill Community Farm, North Grafton, Massachusetts
Due this date: Presentation of One Lesson to your peers.
Journal and Lesson Plans are due at this session.

 

Using Massachusetts Farms as your classroom, learn how agriculture can enhance your curriculum, enthrall your students and make connections to the Curriculum Standards. Workshops offer hands-on, open-ended experiences, activities and resources related to a variety of agricultural topics. Participants will:

Sponsored by:

Massachusetts Agriculture in the Classroom & Fitchburg State College